Fun Facts From Five of the World’s Busiest Metro Systems

THESE WALLS CAN TALK

Subway systems have come a long way since London’s steam-hauled Metropolitan Railway opened in 1863, marking the beginning of rapid transit as we know it.

Steam engines eventually made way for electric traction systems, and soon the technology spread to cities around the globe.

Many of the world’s metro systems have their own unique features that set them apart, from the stunning underground “palaces” in Moscow to the high-tech stations of Seoul, complete with heated seats and Wi-Fi network access.

Here are some interesting stats from metro systems around the world.

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Tokyo, Japan

Began operating: 1915 for postal employees; 1927 for all passengers

Number of stations: 285

Number of lines: 13

Daily ridership: 8.7 million

Annual ridership: 3.217 billion

Did you know?  Tokyo’s metro system has special cars reserved for women.

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Paris, France

Began operating: 1900, during the World’s Fair

Number of stations: 303

Number of lines: 16

Daily ridership: 4.21 million

Annual ridership: 1.527 billion

Did you know?  The Paris Metro was the first system to use rubber tires on its cars.

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Moscow, Russia

Began operating: 1935

Number of stations: 200

Number of lines: 12

Daily ridership: 9.716 million

Annual ridership: 2.491 billion

Did you know?  Many of Moscow’s metro stations resemble baroque-themed palaces.

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New York City, United States

Began operating: 1904

Number of stations: 469

Number of lines: 34

Daily ridership: 5.6 million

Annual ridership: 1.751 billion

Did you know?  Laid end to end, NYC’s 842 miles of subway tracks would stretch to Chicago.

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London, United Kingdom

Began operating: 1863

Number of stations: 270

Number of lines: 11

Daily ridership: 3.23 million

Annual ridership: 1.305 billion

Did you know?  The London Underground is the world’s oldest metro system.

 

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